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Wamphyri

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About Wamphyri

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  1. Well I managed to purchase a used one last night plus a few other items for a decent price. So far I'm pretty happy with it. debating if i wish to make it my new work mod or not since my alien has been beaten 1/2 an inch away from its life.
  2. One of the world’s most prestigious medical organizations has delivered a groundbreaking 200-page report that supports e-cigarettes as a tool to quit smoking and demolishes several vaping myths in the process. The Royal College of Physicians (RCP), the most respected medical institution in the United Kingdom, concluded e-cigarettes are 95 percent safer than regular cigarettes and are likely to be hugely beneficial to public health. Titled “Nicotine without smoke: tobacco harm reduction,” the report is one of the most comprehensive ever published examining e-cigarettes and could be a game changer for health officials and politicians all over the world. The RCP’s seminal 1962 report, which demonstrated the link between smoking, lung disease and bronchitis spurred the U.S. Surgeon General to publish the historic 1964 “Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the United States.” The RCP’s new report tears apart scare stories, including the ever-more popular idea that vaping is somehow a gateway to smoking. “To date, there is no evidence that any of these processes is occurring to any significant degree in the UK,” said the report’s authors. (RELATED: CDC Admits, No ‘Concrete’ Evidence E-Cigarettes Are Gateway To Smoking) The authors are emphatic there is no evidence e-cigarette use has in any way “renormalized” smoking. “None of these products has to date attracted significant use among adult never-smokers, or demonstrated evidence of significant gateway progression into smoking among young people.” One of the most damaging myths about e-cigarettes that caught fire in 2015 was e-cigarettes don’t actually help smokers quit. (RELATED: Study Claiming E-Cigarettes Make Quitting Harder Exposed As ‘Unscientific Hatchet Job’) Contrary to the claims of some public health activists in the U.S., the RCP is clear: e-cigarettes can help smokers kick their habit for good. “Among smokers, e-cigarette use is likely to lead to quit attempts that would not otherwise have happened, and in a proportion of these to successful cessation. In this way, e-cigarettes can act as a gateway from smoking.” (RELATED: Study Finds E-Cigarettes Raise Chances Of Quitting, ‘Can Save Lives’) The RCP does not claim vaping is totally safe, as vapers inhale nicotine and flavorings. But they conclude any risk to vapers is likely to be “very small, and substantially smaller than that arising from tobacco smoking.” Concurring with a previous report by Public Health England, RCP believes the health risks to vapers is unlikely to reach more than five percent of the risks associated with smoking. The report also warns overzealous policymakers to resist the temptation to regulate e-cigarettes in a way that would stifle innovation or discourage use. “This report lays to rest almost all of the concerns over these products, and concludes that, with sensible regulation, electronic cigarettes have the potential to make a major contribution towards preventing the premature death, disease and social inequalities in health that smoking currently causes in the UK,” said Professor John Britton, chair of the RCP’s Tobacco Advisory Group. “Smokers should be reassured that these products can help them quit all tobacco use forever,” he added. Those most applauding the study’s conclusions are e-cig groups who have been fighting an onslaught of attacks from politicians and dubious public health researchers. (RELATED: Read The Stunning Correction This Scientist Dropped On Her Own Anti-E-Cig Study) “When the RCP told the truth about cigarettes in 1962, it took two years for the U.S. government to play catch up and release its own report. It should not take two months, let alone two years, for American public health authorities to correct their past misstatements about vaping. The FDA and CDC must seriously consider the RCP’s guidance before moving forward on any new regulations or public campaigns about smoke-free nicotine products,” said Gregory Conley, president of the American Vaping Association. “For those in mainstream tobacco control, the question for them is, how can you dismiss this report out of hand? The authors are credible experts without financial conflicts of interest in tobacco or vapor products. At some point, these groups will have to realize that the science has long outpaced their rhetoric,” Conley added. Cancer charities added their voices to the chorus of praise for the RCP’s report. “This important report is an accurate summary of the latest scientific evidence on e-cigarettes and will help dispel the increasingly common misconception that they’re as harmful as smoking. They’re not,” said Cancer Research UK’s director of prevention Alison Cox.
  3. Two UK hospitals abolished a ban on the use of e-cigarettes Thursday thanks to overwhelming evidence showing they’re vastly safer than tobacco cigarettes. A National Health Service Trust, which runs two hospitals in the city of Nottingham, revised its position on vaping in light of a groundbreaking report from the Royal College of Physicians (RCP), which enthusiastically endorsed e-cigarettes as a safer alternative to smoking. An earlier report published by Public Health England concluded e-cigarettes are 95 percent safer than tobacco cigarettes. “We have a duty to help our patients and staff make healthy life choices, and can’t ignore the potential benefits of electronic cigarettes as a nicotine replacement therapy,” said Dr. Stephen Fowlie, medical director at the trust. “We’re now allowing e-cigarettes on our grounds to give our patients, staff, and visitors more choice in how they quit smoking,” Fowlie added. “We need to encourage all patients and visitors who smoke and find it difficult to abstain while in hospital grounds to use medicinal nicotine or an electronic cigarette,” said Professor John Britton, a respiratory consultant at the trust and contributor to the RCP report. The RCP’s position is e-cigarettes are 95 percent safer than regular cigarettes and are likely to be hugely beneficial to public health. (RELATED: Game Changer: World Leading Medical Group Backs E-Cigarettes) “This report lays to rest almost all of the concerns over these products, and concludes that, with sensible regulation, electronic cigarettes have the potential to make a major contribution towards preventing the premature death, disease and social inequalities in health that smoking currently causes in the UK,” said Britton, who also chairs the RCP’s Tobacco Advisory Group. “Smokers should be reassured that these products can help them quit all tobacco use forever.”
  4. Starting with the list if products. YiHI-JoyStick Authentic YiHi Joy Stick Button - For Sx550 & SX475 Chips YiHsxminichip-550-200W Chip Authentic YiHi SXmini 550J - Temperature Control - 200W Blue Tooth Chip! Magnets 6mm x 3mm Disc 4mm x 3mm Cyl 18650 Dual Battery Sleds Fat Daddy V4 low profile 510 Connectors 16mm Black Push Button Still looking for a resin or stabilized wood blank..
  5. Results obtained from an air sample of a small non-ventilated vape shop, clearly indicate that the amount of toxic substances present in the air where a lot of vaping is taking place, are of insignificant levels. The California Department of Public Health has been carrying out air sampling in vape shops throughout the state, as part of its initiative to determine the health effects of second-hand vapor exposure. Earlier today in his blog, Public Health Expert Dr. Michael Siegel pointed out that the results for this report were obtained from a relatively small and non-ventilated vape shop, where many of the employees and 13 customers were actively vaping while the sampling was taking place, hence what would be considered a situation presenting a high level of exposure to second-hand vapor. However, given all these unfavourable conditions, the results still reported no dangerous levels of exposure to any hazardous chemicals. “This study, although conducted under very high exposure conditions in a small, non-ventilated vape shop with many employees and customers vaping and clouds of vapor visible, did not document any dangerous levels of exposure to any hazardous chemical.” Dr. Michael Siegel The main results of the air sampling go as follows : Nicotine: Not detected Glycidol: Not detected Formaldehyde: 7.2 ppb Diacetyl: Not detected using standard method 2,3-Pentanedione: Not detected using standard method Acetyl butyryl: Not detected using standard method Acetoin: Not detected using standard method Acetone: Not detected Ethyl benzene: Not detected m,p-Xylene: Not detected o-Xylene: Not detected Toluene: Not detected Acetaldehyde: Not detected Acetonitrile: Not detected alpha-pinene: Not detected Benzene: Not detected Chloroform: Not detected d-Limonene: Not detected Methylene chloride: Not detected Methyl methacrylate: Not detected n-Hexane: Not detected Styrene: Not detected Finally putting fears about formaldehyde to rest? No justification for governments to ban vaping “This study adds to the evidence that under real-life conditions, ‘secondhand vaping’ does not appear to pose any significant health risks.” concluded the public health expert. He added that whilst he himself has been behind many of the smoking bans that took place, based on this current evidence he fails to see a reason as to why governments should ban vaping in public spaces. “With regards to vaping, I just don’t see any reasonable evidence at this time that it poses any significant health hazard to bystanders.”
  6. The Tennessee Department of Health issued a “public health advisory” last week about “electronic nicotine delivery systems, ENDS, including electronic cigarettes, e-cigs, e-cigars, e-pipes, e-hookahs, personal vaporizers and similar emissions-producing devices.” The 13-point warning covers plenty of ground, and contains the all the usual concerns, along with the expected number of “mays” and “mights.” Nicotine can be toxic, they say. Flavors may be attractive to children. Vapor can contain “formaldehyde, propylene glycol, acetaldehyde, acrolein and tobacco-specific nitrosamines.” Apparently, they get the wording for their public health advisories from Google searches. Big deal, you’re probably saying. We see hilariously bad warnings from public health agencies all the time. Normally, we pay about as much attention as the actual public does (none). Why is this one different? Well, the Tennessee DOH has come up with an exciting new concern — one that showed creativity rarely seen in an office full of people who probably consult a manual before thinking. They could contain strychnine too. They might contain anthrax, for that matter. “Persons should not use ENDS devices offered to them by friends or acquaintances to prevent the spread of illness,” they say. And “more importantly, ENDS can be delivery systems for incapacitating agents such as gamma butyrolactone, GBL, more commonly known as the date rape drug.” Date rape! Winner, champion, best of show, blue ribbon! That’s a worry even Tom Frieden has missed. And no wonder, because there has never, ever been a report of any such thing happening. Could it happen? Yes, and that gum or soda or ice cream a stranger hands you could contain the very same things. Hey, they could contain strychnine too. They might contain anthrax, for that matter. And let’s not forget radioactive polonium while we’re at it. The point is, if someone wants to dose you with anything, there are a million ways. These are the Reefer Madness-level scare tactics the anti-vaping zealots think they need to make an impact on public opinion at this point. They know that Americans have been vaping now for a decade, and none of the frightening outcomes they’ve warned about has come to pass. They’re getting desperate.
  7. Well after my experience with a eGo pen a friend of mine suggested I try a actual mod, so we traveled down to the local the B&M on a Saturday morning, after the better part of a hour debating on either the Snow wolf, or the SMOK Alien I settled on the Alien and haven't looked back. Now down to the good stuff, 7 months later through countless falls from 3' to 5' the mod would hit the ground, battery door would pop open, batteries flying out in every which direction. The mod I would love to say. Still works, the pain on the other hand is something less then desirable but that's only cosmetic. Screen still intact, mod fires all the time in all conditions. For a good mod thats entry level to get you onto the road to vaping weather you want it as a hobby or as a quit smoking concession I would recommend the SMOK Alien 220 hands down. It has proven itself in the work field (Landscaping, Snow clearing during the winter) and just keeps on going!
  8. There "almost" good enough for a try before you buy because there THAT cheap. If you start with one of these its a good chance you won't have a pleasant vaping experience. I would suggest spending a few extra dollers and get the T18 or even T22. At least then you get a bit more of a vaping experience and will enjoy it a bit more.
  9. PG (Propylene Glycol) vs. VG (Vegetable Glycerin) When it comes to e-juice, two terms constantly crop up: PG and VG. This can seem confusing to the newcomer, but knowledge of these two ingredients can vastly improve your vaping experience. Here’s our easy-to-follow guide on everything you need to know about PG and VG. What are PG and VG? In simple terms: Choosing the wrong PG/VG ratio can put first-timers off so be careful to choose the right level for your equipment. Now let’s take a look at each in more detail. PG and VG are the odourless liquids that are combined with flavour and nicotine to create e-juice They produce vapour when heated, which allow them to be inhaled. The two fluids have a different consistency to each other, and also have a slightly different taste. They have distinct mouth and throat sensations when vaped. Most modern e-liquid uses a combination of the two fluids, though the ratio can vary dramatically. Some vaping set-ups can only work with a certain level of PG and VG. PROPYLENE GLYCOL (PG) What exactly is it? Propylene Glycol Chemical Structure PG stands for Propylene Glycol, a petroleum by-product. The fluid has no odour or colour, and is less viscous than VG. In vaping it is used to provide a ‘throat hit’, which some users claim is similar to the sensation experienced when smoking tobacco. It also carries flavour more effectively than VG, meaning it’s the most commonly used suspension fluid for flavour concentrates and nicotine. How is it used? Propylene Glycol can be found in various common household items. Amongst others, these include: Asthma inhalers Pet food Medical products used orally, injected or as topical formulations Beauty products, including make-up, shampoo and baby wipes Is it safe? Studies have shown that PG is safe to ingest orally, and the FDA has deemed it “generally recognized as safe” to be used as a food additive. However, most studies into the safety of propylene glycol look at ingestion, rather than consuming it in aerosol form. Of the limited studies that exist, a long-term experiment held in 1947 judged that inhaling PG was ‘completely harmless’. A 2010 study looking at PGEs (a mixture of propylene glycol and glycol ethers) suggested an increased risk of developing respiratory and immune disorders in children, such as asthma, hay fever and eczema. However, it was judged that glycol ethers, and not PG, are the more likely cause. Looking at the evidence, it is sensible to assume that PG is safe to be inhaled, but there is a need for more comprehensive studies to confirm this. Many misinformed scaremongering stories in the media claim that PG is a toxic substance used in anti-freeze. However, the dangerous substance referred to is actually ethyl glycol, a chemical which is closely related, but not used in vaping. While PG is regarded as safe for humans, it can cause serious harm to pets. It is generally regarded as safe as a food additive for dogs, but has been linked to Heinz body anaemia in cats. Be careful when vaping around pets, particularly if you have cats and use PG in your e-liquid. What should I be aware of when vaping PG? Some people find a high level of PG irritating to the throat. Allergies to PG are rare, but have been reported. If you find yourself coming out in a rash, or suffering other unpleasant reactions after using PG-based e-fluid, you should look at using 100% VG juice instead. Many vendors are starting to offer this as an option. The most common side effects of using e-liquid containing propylene glycol are: dry mouth, sore throat and increased thirst. These symptoms usually last anywhere from a few days to a week as the body gets used to the propylene glycol. It is advised to drink more water and liquids then usual for the first few weeks of using your e-cigarette. Be aware that any unusual reactions could be side effects from quitting smoking, and not necessarily because of the PG. VEGETABLE GLYCERIN (VG) What exactly is it? Glycerin Skelett VG stands for Vegetable Glycerin. It is a natural chemical, derived from vegetable oil, so is safe for vegetarians. It is commonly used in e-liquid to give a ‘thick’ sensation to vapour. VG has a slightly sweet taste and is considerably thicker than PG. The hit from a high VG fluid is a lot smoother than with PG, making it more suitable for sub-ohm vaping. While nicotine and flavourings are commonly suspended in PG, some vendors are offering a VG alternative, to enable 100% VG mixes. What is it used for? Again, it can be found in numerous medical, food and personal care products: Sweetener as sugar replacement Beauty products, such as make-up, mousse, bubble bath, aftershave, and deodorant Pet food Soap and hand cream Food such as baked goods, to increase moisture To provide thick gel for certain medicinal creams, capsule pills and jellies Toothpaste and other dental care products Is it safe? The FDA has classified VG as “generally recognized as safe” and it is widely regarded as one of the most benign substances known to man. The SIDS assessment profile show it to have low toxicity when consumed, and of low potential to irritate the skin or eye. This, along with the widespread use of VG in food and medicine suggest it is safe for humans. However, as with PG, there are limited studies on VG being inhaled as opposed to ingestion. A 2008 study of the toxicity of inhaling aerosolised glycerol found minimal risks. We can assume the use of VG in vaping has no serious impact on health but, as with PG, we would welcome more detailed studies. It is important to note that the risk of being allergic to vegetable glycerin is very low, making it a useful alternative for people who have issues when vaping e-juice containing PG. If you are allergic to palm oil or coconut oil then VG could prove a problem, but this is relatively uncommon. Diabetics could possibly experience problems with metabolising VG, but this would not be an issue at the levels used in vaping. What should I be aware of when using VG? The increased thickness of VG means it can reduce the life of atomisers quicker than PG-based juice. High VG liquids clog up coils more rapidly, and will not work well, if at all, in certain tanks. Older products are especially susceptible, particularly models that use smaller coils such as clearomizers. The Nautilus range, Innokin iclears and eGo tanks are some of the more well-known tanks that are known to have difficulties dealing with high VG fluid. The most common side effect of vaping high VG e-liquid is a dry mouth, sore throat, and increased thirst. Again, be sure to drink plenty of water and take a break from vaping if necessary. What PG/VG ratio should I use? There isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer to this. It depends on the kind of vaping experience you prefer. Many people use various levels of PG and VG for different purposes: Throat Hit – If you enjoy a sharp throat hit when vaping then you’ll prefer a high PG vape. The ‘kick’ at the back of the throat, is something many ex-smokers crave, and PG (along with the nicotine) provides more of this than VG. PG carries flavour marginally better than VG, so the flavour will be slightly improved. Smoothness – High VG fluid tends to give a much smoother feeling on the throat, with a more substantial ‘thicker’ mouthfeel. The flavour is slightly muted in VG fluids, but this can be countered by using more power to produce more vapour. Be careful to stay within the voltage/wattage limits of your atomiser, or you risk dry hits, or even damaging your equipment. Stealth Vaping – If you want to keep your vaping lowkey in public then high PG is the way to go. Less vapour is produced when exhaled, making this ideal for the less ostentatious vaping enthusiast. However, you should always apply common sense. Vaping in certain places, such as waiting rooms and on public transport, is often outlawed and is simply bad manners. As vaping is relatively new, we have a duty to be aware of public opinion and behave responsibly. Cloudchasing – A growing trend in vaping circles is ‘cloudchasing‘. This simply involves exhaling dense clouds of vapour, the thicker the better. There are even competitive events based around this activity, where the person producing the biggest clouds wins. If this appeals then high VG is the only option – the higher the better.
  10. The four basic rules of netiquette are summarized below: New users on the Internet are sometimes called "newbies". Everybody was a newbie once. It is considered to be very good netiquette to share your knowledge and help others who ask questions by email, in news groups, on mailing lists, and in chat rooms, thereby passing on some of the knowledge you have gained. Help the newbies as you wish you were helped. Research Before Asking People on the Internet often get far more email than they can deal with. As a common courtesy to do your part to minimize this email, you should always check the Frequently Asked Questions files, search the Internet, and search the newsgroups for the answer to a question before sending email to a human being. If it turns out that the question was easily obtainable in an obvious place, you may annoy the other person and embarrass yourself. Remember Emotion Don't use capitals unnecessarily in email -- it designates shouting, and is considered rude, as in the following: I THINK THE FACTS PROVE THIS POINT. If you want to emphasize a word, use stars or underlines sparingly. I think the facts *prove* this point. I think the _facts_ prove this point. You can use smileys sparingly to signal emotions like smiles, winks, sadness, surprise, etc. I wish I'd read this before! ;-) I wish I'd read this before. :-( Remember that subtle emotions and meanings do not transmit very well over email. Satire and humour is particularly hard to transmit, and sometimes comes across as rude and contemptuous. Particularly avoid sarcasm, which rarely communicates well. Similarly, don't over-react to email or postings you receive. What looks to you like an insulting or mean message may only be an absent minded and poor choice of phrasing, and not meant the way you perceived it. Be particularly polite when disagreeing with others. Wherever possible, acknowledge good points made, and then respectfully describe the areas where you disagree to produce the most productive conversation. People Aren't Organizations Many people send email from their work email accounts because that is the only email account they have. Never assume that a person is speaking for the organization that they work for. To ensure that people can make this distinction, some folks put a sentence in the signature of their email at work that says something like the following:
  11. The four basic rules of netiquette are summarized below: New users on the Internet are sometimes called "newbies". Everybody was a newbie once. It is considered to be very good netiquette to share your knowledge and help others who ask questions by email, in news groups, on mailing lists, and in chat rooms, thereby passing on some of the knowledge you have gained. Help the newbies as you wish you were helped. Research Before Asking People on the Internet often get far more email than they can deal with. As a common courtesy to do your part to minimize this email, you should always check the Frequently Asked Questions files, search the Internet, and search the newsgroups for the answer to a question before sending email to a human being. If it turns out that the question was easily obtainable in an obvious place, you may annoy the other person and embarrass yourself. Remember Emotion Don't use capitals unnecessarily in email -- it designates shouting, and is considered rude, as in the following: I THINK THE FACTS PROVE THIS POINT. If you want to emphasize a word, use stars or underlines sparingly. I think the facts *prove* this point. I think the _facts_ prove this point. You can use smileys sparingly to signal emotions like smiles, winks, sadness, surprise, etc. I wish I'd read this before! ;-) I wish I'd read this before. :-( Remember that subtle emotions and meanings do not transmit very well over email. Satire and humour is particularly hard to transmit, and sometimes comes across as rude and contemptuous. Particularly avoid sarcasm, which rarely communicates well. Similarly, don't over-react to email or postings you receive. What looks to you like an insulting or mean message may only be an absent minded and poor choice of phrasing, and not meant the way you perceived it. Be particularly polite when disagreeing with others. Wherever possible, acknowledge good points made, and then respectfully describe the areas where you disagree to produce the most productive conversation. People Aren't Organizations Many people send email from their work email accounts because that is the only email account they have. Never assume that a person is speaking for the organization that they work for. To ensure that people can make this distinction, some folks put a sentence in the signature of their email at work that says something like the following: View full article
  12. "Netiquette" stands for "Internet Etiquette", and refers to the set of practices created over the years to make the Internet experience pleasant for everyone. Like other forms of etiquette, netiquette is primarily concerned with matters of courtesy in communications. The following sections provide more information.
  13. "Netiquette" stands for "Internet Etiquette", and refers to the set of practices created over the years to make the Internet experience pleasant for everyone. Like other forms of etiquette, netiquette is primarily concerned with matters of courtesy in communications. The following sections provide more information. View full article
  14. This is a forum for adults, there will be cussing, there will be sexual innuendos. If you find something offensive, you have the option to ignore the poster and have their posts removed from your forum experience. Rules: Be an Adult! (and yes, that means members are 18+, no exceptions) 1. No Drug/Dry Herb/CBD/Wax related pics, videos, posts, or Drug/Dry Herb/CBD/Wax references in comments please or in a user name. 2. No racist, homophobic, bigoted, sexist terms will be tolerated, including in a user name. 3. Only one user membership per person. 4. No posting of nudity pictures- Removals/warnings will be up to the Staff/Admin to determine 5. No affiliate, referral links or hot linked memes, and pics are permitted. Also no raffles or charity funding are to be sold for profit or otherwise including GoFundMe links, and others. Please contact an Admin about legal 501c3, c6, etc Charity raffles or any other types. 6. No pictures or videos of TRUE violence against people or animals. 7. You are not allowed to post anyone's personal information.This is something we take very serious, and may just ban you for it. 8. All above rules also apply to your avatar pic. 9. Threads, and Posts must be in the appropriate sections. Please NO spamming outside the appropriate sections, this also includes Profile, PM, and Tag Spamming. Moderators will move or delete it, and issue warning points. If there is no appropriate section for your thread or post that is unrelated to vaping e-cigs then more then likely it does not belong in the forum. Any questions or concerns on the RULES please PM a moderator. Moderators are monitoring the forum at all times.
  15. For beginners, it’s best to start with a simple recipe or a one-shot concentrate. We’ll look at finding these in more detail below. Or if you have a great idea for a flavour combination, you can jump right in. But be sure to make detailed notes so you can tweak future versions. 1) Recipe And Ratios The first step is to find a recipe you like the sound of, and buy the relevant concentrates. For this example, we’ll use the recipe for Mustard Milk, a popular strawberry milkshake flavour, created by reddit user and leading DIY e-juice maker Fizzmustard: Strawberry (TPA) 6% Vanilla Bean Ice Cream (TPA) 6% (TPA is the abbreviation for The Perfumers Apprentice, a major flavour manufacturer. But when going to TPA, you want to use their products listed under the Flavor Apprentice for your DIY endeavors). Now we need to decide what PG/VG ratio to use. Fizzmustard recommends VG/PG 70/30, which makes it suitable for sub ohm vaping. You could also try out max VG, or if you want a version that works in a plus-ohm tank try a higher ratio of PG such as 50/50. If you change the VG/PG ratio you might need to adjust the amount of flavour added to get a similar taste. Next, choose your nicotine level. Here, we’ll make a 10 mL bottle of Mustard Milk with 6 mg nicotine and VG/PG at a 70/30 ratio, but you can adjust to your personal taste. 2) Measurements Now we have our choices we need to work out the amounts to use. This can be complicated to do by hand, but don’t worry, there are various online juice calculators that do it automatically. For best results, set up an account on VT Calc – it’s easy to use and you can access your recipes it from any online device. (Other more-comprehensive juice calculators such as DIYJuiceCalculator and Steam Engine are also recommended.) Go to the create recipe page, input the relevant details and hit save. This will produce a table showing the volume, weight and percentage of each ingredient. Another good all-in-one calculator is at vapetips.net. You’ll be able to save your e-liquid recipes as private or public (so other users can see it). 3) Mixing Time to get your hands dirty. First, and most importantly, set aside a safe hygienic area in a clean room with no pets or children around. Use rubber gloves and a plastic tray in case of spillage. By Weight – If you’re using scales, you should focus on the grams. Put your empty 10 mL bottle on the scales and set it to zero. Now add your flavours by dripping in the correct amount in grams. Then add nicotine using a dropper or syringe and be careful not spill any. Use your squeezy bottles to add the PG and VG. If you prefer to use syringes, make sure you use a fresh one for each ingredient to avoid cross-contamination. The final weight should match that shown on VT Calculator. By Volume – If you’re mixing by volume it’s a bit trickier. Using separate syringes for each component, check the measurements on the syringe to gauge the mL and add these to the empty 10 mL bottle. Each flavour concentrate and nicotine will require an individual 1 mL syringe. Be aware that this method is less accurate than using scales. Note: Another way to use volume, and possibly the simplest (albeit maybe not the most easy to convey for others to replicate or to scale up) is by using drops as your measurements. It works really well with flavorings, and if you make a small investment in empty plastic dropper bottles (ideally with all the same size droppers) it should suit you fine. This is the least precise way of measuring for nicotine, so we caution against using drops to get your nic percentage bang-on. Congratulation, you now you have your first homemade bottle of DIY e-juice! What now?