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Wamphyri

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About Wamphyri

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  1. The Tennessee Department of Health issued a “public health advisory” last week about “electronic nicotine delivery systems, ENDS, including electronic cigarettes, e-cigs, e-cigars, e-pipes, e-hookahs, personal vaporizers and similar emissions-producing devices.” The 13-point warning covers plenty of ground, and contains the all the usual concerns, along with the expected number of “mays” and “mights.” Nicotine can be toxic, they say. Flavors may be attractive to children. Vapor can contain “formaldehyde, propylene glycol, acetaldehyde, acrolein and tobacco-specific nitrosamines.” Apparently, they get the wording for their public health advisories from Google searches. Big deal, you’re probably saying. We see hilariously bad warnings from public health agencies all the time. Normally, we pay about as much attention as the actual public does (none). Why is this one different? Well, the Tennessee DOH has come up with an exciting new concern — one that showed creativity rarely seen in an office full of people who probably consult a manual before thinking. They could contain strychnine too. They might contain anthrax, for that matter. “Persons should not use ENDS devices offered to them by friends or acquaintances to prevent the spread of illness,” they say. And “more importantly, ENDS can be delivery systems for incapacitating agents such as gamma butyrolactone, GBL, more commonly known as the date rape drug.” Date rape! Winner, champion, best of show, blue ribbon! That’s a worry even Tom Frieden has missed. And no wonder, because there has never, ever been a report of any such thing happening. Could it happen? Yes, and that gum or soda or ice cream a stranger hands you could contain the very same things. Hey, they could contain strychnine too. They might contain anthrax, for that matter. And let’s not forget radioactive polonium while we’re at it. The point is, if someone wants to dose you with anything, there are a million ways. These are the Reefer Madness-level scare tactics the anti-vaping zealots think they need to make an impact on public opinion at this point. They know that Americans have been vaping now for a decade, and none of the frightening outcomes they’ve warned about has come to pass. They’re getting desperate.
  2. Well after my experience with a eGo pen a friend of mine suggested I try a actual mod, so we traveled down to the local the B&M on a Saturday morning, after the better part of a hour debating on either the Snow wolf, or the SMOK Alien I settled on the Alien and haven't looked back. Now down to the good stuff, 7 months later through countless falls from 3' to 5' the mod would hit the ground, battery door would pop open, batteries flying out in every which direction. The mod I would love to say. Still works, the pain on the other hand is something less then desirable but that's only cosmetic. Screen still intact, mod fires all the time in all conditions. For a good mod thats entry level to get you onto the road to vaping weather you want it as a hobby or as a quit smoking concession I would recommend the SMOK Alien 220 hands down. It has proven itself in the work field (Landscaping, Snow clearing during the winter) and just keeps on going!
  3. There "almost" good enough for a try before you buy because there THAT cheap. If you start with one of these its a good chance you won't have a pleasant vaping experience. I would suggest spending a few extra dollers and get the T18 or even T22. At least then you get a bit more of a vaping experience and will enjoy it a bit more.
  4. PG (Propylene Glycol) vs. VG (Vegetable Glycerin) When it comes to e-juice, two terms constantly crop up: PG and VG. This can seem confusing to the newcomer, but knowledge of these two ingredients can vastly improve your vaping experience. Here’s our easy-to-follow guide on everything you need to know about PG and VG. What are PG and VG? In simple terms: Choosing the wrong PG/VG ratio can put first-timers off so be careful to choose the right level for your equipment. Now let’s take a look at each in more detail. PG and VG are the odourless liquids that are combined with flavour and nicotine to create e-juice They produce vapour when heated, which allow them to be inhaled. The two fluids have a different consistency to each other, and also have a slightly different taste. They have distinct mouth and throat sensations when vaped. Most modern e-liquid uses a combination of the two fluids, though the ratio can vary dramatically. Some vaping set-ups can only work with a certain level of PG and VG. PROPYLENE GLYCOL (PG) What exactly is it? Propylene Glycol Chemical Structure PG stands for Propylene Glycol, a petroleum by-product. The fluid has no odour or colour, and is less viscous than VG. In vaping it is used to provide a ‘throat hit’, which some users claim is similar to the sensation experienced when smoking tobacco. It also carries flavour more effectively than VG, meaning it’s the most commonly used suspension fluid for flavour concentrates and nicotine. How is it used? Propylene Glycol can be found in various common household items. Amongst others, these include: Asthma inhalers Pet food Medical products used orally, injected or as topical formulations Beauty products, including make-up, shampoo and baby wipes Is it safe? Studies have shown that PG is safe to ingest orally, and the FDA has deemed it “generally recognized as safe” to be used as a food additive. However, most studies into the safety of propylene glycol look at ingestion, rather than consuming it in aerosol form. Of the limited studies that exist, a long-term experiment held in 1947 judged that inhaling PG was ‘completely harmless’. A 2010 study looking at PGEs (a mixture of propylene glycol and glycol ethers) suggested an increased risk of developing respiratory and immune disorders in children, such as asthma, hay fever and eczema. However, it was judged that glycol ethers, and not PG, are the more likely cause. Looking at the evidence, it is sensible to assume that PG is safe to be inhaled, but there is a need for more comprehensive studies to confirm this. Many misinformed scaremongering stories in the media claim that PG is a toxic substance used in anti-freeze. However, the dangerous substance referred to is actually ethyl glycol, a chemical which is closely related, but not used in vaping. While PG is regarded as safe for humans, it can cause serious harm to pets. It is generally regarded as safe as a food additive for dogs, but has been linked to Heinz body anaemia in cats. Be careful when vaping around pets, particularly if you have cats and use PG in your e-liquid. What should I be aware of when vaping PG? Some people find a high level of PG irritating to the throat. Allergies to PG are rare, but have been reported. If you find yourself coming out in a rash, or suffering other unpleasant reactions after using PG-based e-fluid, you should look at using 100% VG juice instead. Many vendors are starting to offer this as an option. The most common side effects of using e-liquid containing propylene glycol are: dry mouth, sore throat and increased thirst. These symptoms usually last anywhere from a few days to a week as the body gets used to the propylene glycol. It is advised to drink more water and liquids then usual for the first few weeks of using your e-cigarette. Be aware that any unusual reactions could be side effects from quitting smoking, and not necessarily because of the PG. VEGETABLE GLYCERIN (VG) What exactly is it? Glycerin Skelett VG stands for Vegetable Glycerin. It is a natural chemical, derived from vegetable oil, so is safe for vegetarians. It is commonly used in e-liquid to give a ‘thick’ sensation to vapour. VG has a slightly sweet taste and is considerably thicker than PG. The hit from a high VG fluid is a lot smoother than with PG, making it more suitable for sub-ohm vaping. While nicotine and flavourings are commonly suspended in PG, some vendors are offering a VG alternative, to enable 100% VG mixes. What is it used for? Again, it can be found in numerous medical, food and personal care products: Sweetener as sugar replacement Beauty products, such as make-up, mousse, bubble bath, aftershave, and deodorant Pet food Soap and hand cream Food such as baked goods, to increase moisture To provide thick gel for certain medicinal creams, capsule pills and jellies Toothpaste and other dental care products Is it safe? The FDA has classified VG as “generally recognized as safe” and it is widely regarded as one of the most benign substances known to man. The SIDS assessment profile show it to have low toxicity when consumed, and of low potential to irritate the skin or eye. This, along with the widespread use of VG in food and medicine suggest it is safe for humans. However, as with PG, there are limited studies on VG being inhaled as opposed to ingestion. A 2008 study of the toxicity of inhaling aerosolised glycerol found minimal risks. We can assume the use of VG in vaping has no serious impact on health but, as with PG, we would welcome more detailed studies. It is important to note that the risk of being allergic to vegetable glycerin is very low, making it a useful alternative for people who have issues when vaping e-juice containing PG. If you are allergic to palm oil or coconut oil then VG could prove a problem, but this is relatively uncommon. Diabetics could possibly experience problems with metabolising VG, but this would not be an issue at the levels used in vaping. What should I be aware of when using VG? The increased thickness of VG means it can reduce the life of atomisers quicker than PG-based juice. High VG liquids clog up coils more rapidly, and will not work well, if at all, in certain tanks. Older products are especially susceptible, particularly models that use smaller coils such as clearomizers. The Nautilus range, Innokin iclears and eGo tanks are some of the more well-known tanks that are known to have difficulties dealing with high VG fluid. The most common side effect of vaping high VG e-liquid is a dry mouth, sore throat, and increased thirst. Again, be sure to drink plenty of water and take a break from vaping if necessary. What PG/VG ratio should I use? There isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer to this. It depends on the kind of vaping experience you prefer. Many people use various levels of PG and VG for different purposes: Throat Hit – If you enjoy a sharp throat hit when vaping then you’ll prefer a high PG vape. The ‘kick’ at the back of the throat, is something many ex-smokers crave, and PG (along with the nicotine) provides more of this than VG. PG carries flavour marginally better than VG, so the flavour will be slightly improved. Smoothness – High VG fluid tends to give a much smoother feeling on the throat, with a more substantial ‘thicker’ mouthfeel. The flavour is slightly muted in VG fluids, but this can be countered by using more power to produce more vapour. Be careful to stay within the voltage/wattage limits of your atomiser, or you risk dry hits, or even damaging your equipment. Stealth Vaping – If you want to keep your vaping lowkey in public then high PG is the way to go. Less vapour is produced when exhaled, making this ideal for the less ostentatious vaping enthusiast. However, you should always apply common sense. Vaping in certain places, such as waiting rooms and on public transport, is often outlawed and is simply bad manners. As vaping is relatively new, we have a duty to be aware of public opinion and behave responsibly. Cloudchasing – A growing trend in vaping circles is ‘cloudchasing‘. This simply involves exhaling dense clouds of vapour, the thicker the better. There are even competitive events based around this activity, where the person producing the biggest clouds wins. If this appeals then high VG is the only option – the higher the better.
  5. The four basic rules of netiquette are summarized below: New users on the Internet are sometimes called "newbies". Everybody was a newbie once. It is considered to be very good netiquette to share your knowledge and help others who ask questions by email, in news groups, on mailing lists, and in chat rooms, thereby passing on some of the knowledge you have gained. Help the newbies as you wish you were helped. Research Before Asking People on the Internet often get far more email than they can deal with. As a common courtesy to do your part to minimize this email, you should always check the Frequently Asked Questions files, search the Internet, and search the newsgroups for the answer to a question before sending email to a human being. If it turns out that the question was easily obtainable in an obvious place, you may annoy the other person and embarrass yourself. Remember Emotion Don't use capitals unnecessarily in email -- it designates shouting, and is considered rude, as in the following: I THINK THE FACTS PROVE THIS POINT. If you want to emphasize a word, use stars or underlines sparingly. I think the facts *prove* this point. I think the _facts_ prove this point. You can use smileys sparingly to signal emotions like smiles, winks, sadness, surprise, etc. I wish I'd read this before! ;-) I wish I'd read this before. :-( Remember that subtle emotions and meanings do not transmit very well over email. Satire and humour is particularly hard to transmit, and sometimes comes across as rude and contemptuous. Particularly avoid sarcasm, which rarely communicates well. Similarly, don't over-react to email or postings you receive. What looks to you like an insulting or mean message may only be an absent minded and poor choice of phrasing, and not meant the way you perceived it. Be particularly polite when disagreeing with others. Wherever possible, acknowledge good points made, and then respectfully describe the areas where you disagree to produce the most productive conversation. People Aren't Organizations Many people send email from their work email accounts because that is the only email account they have. Never assume that a person is speaking for the organization that they work for. To ensure that people can make this distinction, some folks put a sentence in the signature of their email at work that says something like the following:
  6. The four basic rules of netiquette are summarized below: New users on the Internet are sometimes called "newbies". Everybody was a newbie once. It is considered to be very good netiquette to share your knowledge and help others who ask questions by email, in news groups, on mailing lists, and in chat rooms, thereby passing on some of the knowledge you have gained. Help the newbies as you wish you were helped. Research Before Asking People on the Internet often get far more email than they can deal with. As a common courtesy to do your part to minimize this email, you should always check the Frequently Asked Questions files, search the Internet, and search the newsgroups for the answer to a question before sending email to a human being. If it turns out that the question was easily obtainable in an obvious place, you may annoy the other person and embarrass yourself. Remember Emotion Don't use capitals unnecessarily in email -- it designates shouting, and is considered rude, as in the following: I THINK THE FACTS PROVE THIS POINT. If you want to emphasize a word, use stars or underlines sparingly. I think the facts *prove* this point. I think the _facts_ prove this point. You can use smileys sparingly to signal emotions like smiles, winks, sadness, surprise, etc. I wish I'd read this before! ;-) I wish I'd read this before. :-( Remember that subtle emotions and meanings do not transmit very well over email. Satire and humour is particularly hard to transmit, and sometimes comes across as rude and contemptuous. Particularly avoid sarcasm, which rarely communicates well. Similarly, don't over-react to email or postings you receive. What looks to you like an insulting or mean message may only be an absent minded and poor choice of phrasing, and not meant the way you perceived it. Be particularly polite when disagreeing with others. Wherever possible, acknowledge good points made, and then respectfully describe the areas where you disagree to produce the most productive conversation. People Aren't Organizations Many people send email from their work email accounts because that is the only email account they have. Never assume that a person is speaking for the organization that they work for. To ensure that people can make this distinction, some folks put a sentence in the signature of their email at work that says something like the following: View full article
  7. "Netiquette" stands for "Internet Etiquette", and refers to the set of practices created over the years to make the Internet experience pleasant for everyone. Like other forms of etiquette, netiquette is primarily concerned with matters of courtesy in communications. The following sections provide more information. View full article
  8. "Netiquette" stands for "Internet Etiquette", and refers to the set of practices created over the years to make the Internet experience pleasant for everyone. Like other forms of etiquette, netiquette is primarily concerned with matters of courtesy in communications. The following sections provide more information.
  9. This is a forum for adults, there will be cussing, there will be sexual innuendos. If you find something offensive, you have the option to ignore the poster and have their posts removed from your forum experience. Rules: Be an Adult! (and yes, that means members are 18+, no exceptions) 1. No Drug/Dry Herb/CBD/Wax related pics, videos, posts, or Drug/Dry Herb/CBD/Wax references in comments please or in a user name. 2. No racist, homophobic, bigoted, sexist terms will be tolerated, including in a user name. 3. Only one user membership per person. 4. No posting of nudity pictures- Removals/warnings will be up to the Staff/Admin to determine 5. No affiliate, referral links or hot linked memes, and pics are permitted. Also no raffles or charity funding are to be sold for profit or otherwise including GoFundMe links, and others. Please contact an Admin about legal 501c3, c6, etc Charity raffles or any other types. 6. No pictures or videos of TRUE violence against people or animals. 7. You are not allowed to post anyone's personal information.This is something we take very serious, and may just ban you for it. 8. All above rules also apply to your avatar pic. 9. Threads, and Posts must be in the appropriate sections. Please NO spamming outside the appropriate sections, this also includes Profile, PM, and Tag Spamming. Moderators will move or delete it, and issue warning points. If there is no appropriate section for your thread or post that is unrelated to vaping e-cigs then more then likely it does not belong in the forum. Any questions or concerns on the RULES please PM a moderator. Moderators are monitoring the forum at all times.
  10. For beginners, it’s best to start with a simple recipe or a one-shot concentrate. We’ll look at finding these in more detail below. Or if you have a great idea for a flavour combination, you can jump right in. But be sure to make detailed notes so you can tweak future versions. 1) Recipe And Ratios The first step is to find a recipe you like the sound of, and buy the relevant concentrates. For this example, we’ll use the recipe for Mustard Milk, a popular strawberry milkshake flavour, created by reddit user and leading DIY e-juice maker Fizzmustard: Strawberry (TPA) 6% Vanilla Bean Ice Cream (TPA) 6% (TPA is the abbreviation for The Perfumers Apprentice, a major flavour manufacturer. But when going to TPA, you want to use their products listed under the Flavor Apprentice for your DIY endeavors). Now we need to decide what PG/VG ratio to use. Fizzmustard recommends VG/PG 70/30, which makes it suitable for sub ohm vaping. You could also try out max VG, or if you want a version that works in a plus-ohm tank try a higher ratio of PG such as 50/50. If you change the VG/PG ratio you might need to adjust the amount of flavour added to get a similar taste. Next, choose your nicotine level. Here, we’ll make a 10 mL bottle of Mustard Milk with 6 mg nicotine and VG/PG at a 70/30 ratio, but you can adjust to your personal taste. 2) Measurements Now we have our choices we need to work out the amounts to use. This can be complicated to do by hand, but don’t worry, there are various online juice calculators that do it automatically. For best results, set up an account on VT Calc – it’s easy to use and you can access your recipes it from any online device. (Other more-comprehensive juice calculators such as DIYJuiceCalculator and Steam Engine are also recommended.) Go to the create recipe page, input the relevant details and hit save. This will produce a table showing the volume, weight and percentage of each ingredient. Another good all-in-one calculator is at vapetips.net. You’ll be able to save your e-liquid recipes as private or public (so other users can see it). 3) Mixing Time to get your hands dirty. First, and most importantly, set aside a safe hygienic area in a clean room with no pets or children around. Use rubber gloves and a plastic tray in case of spillage. By Weight – If you’re using scales, you should focus on the grams. Put your empty 10 mL bottle on the scales and set it to zero. Now add your flavours by dripping in the correct amount in grams. Then add nicotine using a dropper or syringe and be careful not spill any. Use your squeezy bottles to add the PG and VG. If you prefer to use syringes, make sure you use a fresh one for each ingredient to avoid cross-contamination. The final weight should match that shown on VT Calculator. By Volume – If you’re mixing by volume it’s a bit trickier. Using separate syringes for each component, check the measurements on the syringe to gauge the mL and add these to the empty 10 mL bottle. Each flavour concentrate and nicotine will require an individual 1 mL syringe. Be aware that this method is less accurate than using scales. Note: Another way to use volume, and possibly the simplest (albeit maybe not the most easy to convey for others to replicate or to scale up) is by using drops as your measurements. It works really well with flavorings, and if you make a small investment in empty plastic dropper bottles (ideally with all the same size droppers) it should suit you fine. This is the least precise way of measuring for nicotine, so we caution against using drops to get your nic percentage bang-on. Congratulation, you now you have your first homemade bottle of DIY e-juice! What now?
  11. You’ll need to buy some kit to get started, but you’ll soon make this back by the money you save. First off, you need the four components that make up all e-juice (there’s a list of recommended sellers at the bottom of the page): Propylene Glycol – Otherwise known as PG. You can read more about PG here. If you’re plus-ohm vaping you’ll need a bottle of this. We recommend 500 mL or a litre for starters. Make sure it’s pharmaceutical grade, with no additives. Vegetable Glycerine – Or VG for short. Again, read our previous article for a more detailed breakdown. This will likely make up the bulk of your ejuice, particularly if you’re sub-ohm vaping. We’d recommend buying a litre of pharmaceutical grade to begin with. Nicotine – It’s important to buy good quality nicotine. It degrades rapidly when exposed to air, darkening in colour and taking on a peppery taste, so make sure your sealed nicotine is clear. It depends on your preferred nicotine level but a 100 mL bottle of 72 mg/ mL nicotine should be enough for beginners. Nicotine is usually suspended in a PG solution, so be aware that this will affect the PG/VG ratio of your juice. As we’ve explained in a previous article, be very careful when handling and storing nicotine. Its efficacy as a poison tends to be overstated but spilling it on your skin can cause sickness if not quickly washed off. Of course, if you prefer nicotine-free vape juice you can leave this out. Please keep your nicotine out of children’s reach. Flavour Concentrates – These determine what your juice will ultimately taste like. There are thousands of individual flavours to choose from, which can be combined to make countless unique flavours. You can also buy one-shot flavours, where multiple flavours are pre-mixed. These are ideal for beginners, and some major juice-makers such as Pink Spot and Totally Wicked already sell their own ranges as one-shot concentrates. As well as the liquids you’ll need other equipment for the actual mixing process. There are two methods: mixing by volume and mixing by weight. We’ll look at both, but strongly recommend mixing by weight as it’s cleaner and more accurate. Scales – For mixing by weight, you’ll need a small set of electronic scales that go to 0.01g. This is accurate enough to deal with almost all DIY e-liquid recipes. Storage Bottles – Store your PG and VG in individual squeezy bottles with nozzle tips to make it easy to add to the bottles. A couple of 100 mL condiment bottles should be ideal. Store your nicotine in amber bottles with droppers – the amber glass helps slow the degradation of nicotine and the dropper allows for more precision. Syringes – If you’re mixing by volume, you’ll need a selection of syringes. We advise getting some 10 mL syringes for the PG and VG, and plenty of 1 mL syringes for nicotine and flavour concentrates. You’ll also need some needles – we recommend 14 gauge to make dealing with thick VG easier. E-Juice Bottles – For your early experiments, buy a selection of 10 mL plastic bottles for test recipes and some 50 mL bottles to make large amounts of your favourite homebrew e-liquid. These are cheap and widely available. Labels – Buy some cheap sticky labels to write the details on before sticking to the bottle. In time, you may find it easier and more polished to use a label maker such as the Dymo 160.
  12. DIY-eJuice has become one of the best suppliers for getting concentrate in Canada, family based company who treat there customers beyond what you would expect from a supplier. I've made more then enough orders with a few blunders that where my fault but they still went out of there way to help me correct the issues even tho it was not there fault. There always well know for giving random 3ml concentrate samples with orders. Check them out here http://www.diy-ejuice.com
  13. E Juice– The solution that is vaporized within the atomizer tank, comprised of Vegetable Glycerin, Propylene Glycol, and/or Nicotine and Flavoring. Also referred to as E-liquid, Juice, or Smoke Juice. Ekowool– A specific brand of braided silica used to make wicks for rebuildables. Electronic Cigarette (e-cig)– An emerging alternative to traditional cigarettes that allows users to enjoy smoking without many of the harmful side effects. It contains e liquid that is vaporized upon inhalation and usually consists of flavors and nicotine. E-Hookah – Another term for E-Cigs, it was coined to attract hookah users to vaping due to their similarities. E Liquid– Another popular name for e-juice. E-NIC (Electronic Nicotine Inhaler) – another name for the electronic cigarette. E Smoke – Another short/slong for Electronic Cigarette.
  14. DCT– Dual Coil Tank / large 3 to 6ml Tank with a replaceable carto. Debridge– Removing the bridge (and wick) from an atomizer. Deck– The flat base area where the positive and negative posts sit on an RBA/RDA, which is designed to keep e liquid off of the battery connection. Dewick– Removing the wick from an atomizer. Diacetyl – Diacetyl is a flavoring used in some e-liquid production for it’s buttery flavor. Can cause Bronchiolitis obliterans (otherwise known as Popcorn Lung) if inhaled in large concentrations. Many e-liquid vendors have stopped using it. Digital Cigarette– Another name for Electronic Cigarette Disposable E-Cigs– Electronic cigarettes that are designed to be used and then thrown away. DIY (Do-It-Yourself)– Term used to people that make their own e liquid DNA– The DNA is a small variable wattage board built for vapers by Evolv. Doubler– A double-strength flavour, intended to be used in 50/50 mixes. Dragon Coil – Can be either macro or micro coils, they are wrapped as normal but the wick is wrapped outside of the coil so that air can flow through the inner diameter. Can increase vapor production with enough air flow. Draw– Vapers inhale from their mouth on the electronic cigarette mouthpiece. Drip– To drip drops of e-liquid into an atomizer. Drip Kit– A battery, atomizer chamber, and drip tip, designed specifically for dripping. Drip On-Demand (DOD)– An add-on that is used to feed e liquid into your atomizer by squeezing the bottle. It makes dripping easier. Dripping (DD; direct dripping)– Vaping by adding a few drops of e liquid directly into the atomizer chamber instead of using a cartridge. This is the method that gives the best vapor quantity and flavor quality. Drip Shield– The drip shield is a round metal or plastic tube that slips over your atomizer. If leaking occurs on your atomizer, the liquid will leak into the drip shield instead of leaking onto your PV. It then returns the excess e liquid to the atomizer to be used. Drip Tip– A mouthpiece accessory with an opening that allows drops of e liquid to be dripped directly to the atomizer/cartomizer without the removal of the tip. Drip Well– A bowl shape on a mod where the female connector is located on the atomizer; that is designed to catch any e liquid that might leak out. Dry Burn/Hit– Purposefly firing an atomizer on a battery without e liquid to saturate it, which results in the heating up, and glowing of the coil. This allows the cleaning of the coil by burning off impurities.
  15. Car Adapter – Device that you can connect to a USB charger and charge your e-cig battery in the car. Carcinogen – Any chemical, compound, or substance thought to cause cancer. E-liquid, when heated to very high temperatures can product some carcinogens (by way of incomplete combustion). CASAA– Consumer Advocacy for Smoke-Free Alternatives Association. It is a non profit organization that campaigns for the rights of e-cig users. Cig-A-Like– Any PV that has the similar appearance of a traditional cigarette. Charger – A battery charger used to recharge your e-cig battery once it dies. Clapton Coil – A coil made with a large gauge of wire wrapped tightly by a smaller gauge of wire, like a guitar string. Clouds– Due to the highly dense water content in vapor, The vapor that is exhaled when smoking electronic cigarettes is referred to as clouds. Coil– The wire that is used to vaporize the e liquid by creating an electrical circuit. The coil is usually made up of Nichrome or Kanthal wire. In the United States, the wire being used to make it is measured in AWG, while the rest of the world measures in the metric system. Coil Jig – A device that makes rebuilding your own coils so much simpler. Coil Winder – A tool used to wrap perfect coils every time. Cone Threads– A new threading being implemented by some companies to better secure their atomizers to the batteries. Connection– This is the threaded piece that allows you to screw into an atomizer/cartomizer/clearomizer. Custom Mod– Any PV or APV that was handmade from parts not designed for vaping. This can even include wooden Mods. Cut-Off– A safety feature that automatically stops you from taking a drag on your e cig if you take a drag for too long. It prevents the atomizer from overheating. There are flashing LED lights that usually let you know the feature is being used.